May 16

Nintendo Using “Content ID Match” Claims on YouTube Let’s Plays and Fan-Made Videos

Category: Uncategorized

Wii U YouTube App

Earlier this month, Nintendo became a YouTube partner and they’ve now begun filing “content ID match” claims on several Let’s Play and fan-produced videos featuring Nintendo games and franchises. The claims allow Nintendo to monetize these videos by inserting ads for the company before, next to or at the end of videos.

By doing this, Nintendo is preventing possible ad revenue for Let’s Players and the owners of Nintendo fan video, some of whom make a living producing these videos.

These content claims should only be for ad purposes, but according to sources speaking to Gamasutra, Nintendo has gone so far as to have certain videos removed from YouTube entirely.

“So far it’s mostly been affecting bigger channels and mostly videos posted recently,” said their source. “The main problem is that no one seems to know why they’re doing it or what their eventual goal is.”

In an official statement to the press, Nintendo denies the accusations of shutting down videos, even saying they do not want to block people using their intellectual properties.

“As part of our on-going push to ensure Nintendo content is shared across social media channels in an appropriate and safe way, we became a YouTube partner and as such in February 2013 we registered our copyright content in the YouTube database. For most fan videos this will not result in any changes, however, for those videos featuring Nintendo-owned content, such as images or audio of a certain length, adverts will now appear at the beginning, next to or at the end of the clips. We continually want our fans to enjoy sharing Nintendo content on YouTube, and that is why, unlike other entertainment companies, we have chosen not to block people using our intellectual property.

For more information please visit http://www.youtube.com/yt/copyright/faq.html

Many in the fan gaming community are seeing this as a very negative move from Nintendo. They feel that these videos are practically free advertising and praise for Nintendo and their games, and by going after them, the company is cutting off the nose to spite the face for no good reason.

Source: Gamasutra, Game Front

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